Tag Archives: religions of the world

Oh, I’ve Heard About Your Religion

My religion told me about your religion!  The student of religion is very often discouraged and deterred by the discovery that all religion spends so much time and effort commenting upon, and criticizing the religions of others.

mamertinum

For the good Muslim, it is God who speaks in the Qur’an; it is God who writes the poetry of the Qur’an, and in this poem God mentions the Jewish people and the Christians by name. To be more precise, God devotes more than twenty per cent of the Qur’an to talking about Judaism, Christianity and other religions.

God discusses the failings, or otherwise, of the Sabeans, possibly the Mandaeans, and of numerous ancient religions of various Arabic tribes.

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Filed under Religious Controversy, Religious Literacy

Your Angel, My Devil

One of the more popular topics of discussion in the World Religions class is the subject of angels and demons.

giotto_judgement

Most ideas about angels, devils and demons do not come from sacred writings but more often come from stories, traditions and the arts adjacent to an adherent’s religion. Continue reading

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Filed under Origins, Religious Controversy, Religious Literacy

The First Thing about the Religions of the World

Whatever your opinion of it, religion has dominated human history and still seems to have a controlling interest in our vision of ourselves. In my view, the study and understanding of the religions of the world and an honest pursuit of religious literacy is the antidote to much of the needless conflict and suffering that plagues modern life. Throughout this blog the diligent reader will find my approach to the study of our religious nature and the religions of the world. Continue reading

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Filed under Religious Literacy

Roaming around the Egyptian Desert

In the Christian traditions, the founders of Christian monasticism are often referred to as the Desert Fathers.

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Filed under Religious Literacy